Introduction to Brick Castle

1. Alexander Sprot of brick castle

Sir Alexander Sprot, 1st Baronet, CMG, DL (24 April 1853 8 February 1929) was a British soldier and Scottish Unionist Party politician. He served in the Second Anglo-Afghan War, the Second Boer War and World War I.

During his political career, he represented the constituencies of East Fife and North Lanarkshire.

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2. Military career of brick castle

Sprot was commissioned into the Royal Lanarkshire Militia, where he reached the rank of Lieutenant.

In 1874 he was commissioned Sub-Lieutenant in the 6th Dragoon Guards. He was promoted Lieutenant in 1876, Captain in 1882, Major in 1889, Lieutenant-Colonel in 1900, and Colonel in 1904. He served in the Second Anglo-Afghan War 18791880 (awarded the Afghanistan Medal).

He later served in the Second Boer War (for which he was awarded the Queen's South Africa Medal with 6 clasps, the Kings South Africa Medal with 2 clasps, and was mentioned in despatches twice, including 31 March 1900). He left South Africa in April 1902 on board the SS Walmer Castle, arriving at Southampton early the following month. He retired in 1909, but later served in World War I as an Administrative Commandant from 1915 (being mentioned in despatches twice and awarded the Mons Star, Croix de Guerre, British War Medal and Victory Medal).

He was appointed Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George (CMG) in the 1917 New Year Honours

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3. Political career of brick castle

He unsuccessfully contested Montrose Burghs in 1906. In the two elections in 1910 he stood in East Fife against the Prime Minister H.

H. Asquith. In 1918, Asquith was not opposed by a Coalition candidate, but the local Conservative Association decided to field a candidate against him.

Sprot, despite being refused the "Coupon" the official endorsement given by David Lloyd George and Bonar Law to Coalition candidates defeated Asquith. Sprot sat for that constituency until he was defeated in 1922, and again in 1923. He then sat for North Lanarkshire from 1924 until his death in 1929.

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4. Personal life of brick castle

In 1879 he married Ethel Florence Thorp, daughter of Deputy Surgeon-General Edward C. Thorp, MD.

They had daughters, including: Sarah Douglas Sprot (1887-1975) married 1913, Major William Edgar Mann (1885-1969), D.S.O.

, of the Royal Field Artillery, son of Sir Edward Mann, 1st Baronet. Their son, Major Edward Charles Mann (1918-1959), D.S.

O., M.C.

, 12th Royal Lancers, of The Mill House, Dunsfold, Surrey, was father of Sir Rupert Edward Mann, 3rd Baronet. Mabel Elizabeth Sprot, MBE, who married in 1904 Sir George Stirling, 9th BaronetSir Alexander was also Master of the Fox Hounds with the Fife Hounds. He was created a baronet in 1918.

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5. Early life of brick castle

The only son of Alexander Sprot (1823-1854) of Garnkirk, Lanarkshire, of a family formerly of Edinburgh that owned a brick-making works, and Rachael Jane (daughter of Peter Cleghorn, of Stravithie), he was educated at Harrow School and at Trinity College, Cambridge.

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